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How many original sopwith camel planes are left in the world?

  • There are only 4 other F-1 Camels left in the world today. In addition, there are 3 Navy Type Camels designated 2F-1. All of these are permanently in museums in various stages of originality. Even the Army, Navy, Air Force and Smithsonian museums do not have a "real" Camel! They have only replicas.

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  • Answer: There are only 4 other F-1 Camels left in the world today. In addition, there are 3 Navy Type Camels designated 2F-1. All of these are permanently in museums in various stages of originality. Even the Army, Navy, Air Force and Smithsonian museums do not have a "real" Camel! They have only replicas.
  • Answer:
    One. The Sopwith Camel got that name because of a slight hump behind the engine cowl that acted as a fairing over a portion of the 2 machine guns.
  • Answer: The PBY was by far the most famous. Although, both US & IJN battleships and cruisers had scout planes (reconnaissance planes) stored on board their warships for artillery spotting (to adjust gunfire). These aircraft were equipped with pontoons; they were catapulted off, then after returning they were lifted back on board again by a shipboard crane.
  • Answer: There were certainly scout planes, and later in the war, fighters and bombers.

    Some of the fighter type were Spads, Nieuports, Faeries, Fokkers, among others.
  • Answer: they have changed the world by quicker transportation to places far away! :)
  • Answer: The Army and Navy
  • Answer: Most WW1 aircraft were very small. I have seen replica Sopwith Camel and Spad and were surprised how small and flimsy they appeared to be. Not much different from a Piper Cub, +except for being biplanes.
  • Answer: The Nieuport, Albatross, Sopwith Camel. Spad, and Fokker. Answer Many airplanes were used in WW1 and quite a few were not that common. So, my list of famous planes is quite long as it includes all types of aircraft used from 1914 to 1918. The early planes were quite popular but were eventually replaced by aircraft that had more power, performance and armament. The list includes Trainers, Bombers and Seaplanes.Avro 504 TrainerDeHaviland DH-2 and DH-4Royal Aircraft SE 5Nieuport 11 and 17Albatross D-III and D-VSopwith Type 9400 or 1-1/2 Strutter & Pup & Camel & Triplane & Snipe & DolphineSPAD VII and XIIIFokker E-III monoplane & Dr-1 Triplane & D-VIIGotha Bomber GI thru GIVHandley Page O/400 bomberHansa-Brandenberg W-29 seaplane/fighterRoland C-II 2-seat fighter-bomber "Whale"Bristol F2.B 2-seat Fighter, aka "Brisfit"Ansaldo S.V.A. Scout (Italy) - a great fighter that some consider better than the Fokker D-VIISiemens-Shuckert D.III - small, powerful German fighterLink about WW1 A/C and Aces: http://www.greatwarflyingmuseum.com/aircraft/aircraft.html
  • Answer: The Germans saw great potential for the jet engine airplanesconstructed by Hans Joachim Pabst von Ohain in 1936. TheMesserschmitt Me 262 Schwalbe of Nazi Germany became the firstoperational jet-powered fighter aircraft in 1944. Although designwork started before World War II, there were engine problems andinterference that kept it from becoming functional for many years.
  • Answer: Nearly 300,000 aircraft were built by the US during WWII. Of those, approximately 200,000 were COMBAT airplanes.
  • Answer: It was a scare tactic used by the Luftwaffe. They referred to it as "Tod von oben," or Death from above.

    So, to answer your question,

    Yes and no. Only the Stuka Dive Bombers carried sirens. To the people on the ground being bombed by the stuka it would have sounded like a sirens.
  • Answer: 2 - one went into each tower