Similar Questions

  • Answer:
    Hemiplegic migraines are a specialized migraine variant. They come with specific symptoms not seen in common or classic migraines.

    There are two types of hemiplegic migraines, familial and sporadic.

    Besides the normal migraine symptoms (photophobia, nausea, visual aura, etc..), people with hemiplegic migraines experience some or all of the following:

    During the aura phase they may experience:

    • The paralysis of the limbs on one side of their body (hemiplegia)
    • Numbness, tingling.
    • Motor weakness
    • Speech impairment (slurring or inability to find a word)
    • Impaired Consciousness (ranges from confusion to coma)
    • Fever
    • Symptoms of Meningitis


    The symptoms of hemiplegic migraine can come on very suddenly. Because of this and the severity of these symptoms, and how they mimic many other dangerous problems such as stroke, it is recommended that hemiplegic migraineurs wear a medic alert bracelet.

    The paralysis can last the entire length of the headache phase, the headache may start before paralysis begins, or head pain may be absent altogether.

    The hemiplegic visual aura can be prolonged, and sometimes may even last weeks.

    Currently, many of the abortive medications used in treating classic and common migraines are contraindicated in treating hemiplegic migraine. This is because of the stroke concern, as migraineurs who have such severe headaches with prolonged aura - have a higher stroke risk. For preventative medication, calcium-channel blockers tend to see the most success. So many hemiplegic migraineurs are being prescribed Verapamil, sometimes pairing that with Topamax to lower the frequency of the migraines even further.

    It is essential to be working with a headache specialist when you have been diagnosed with hemiplegic migraines.
  • Answer: Some common migraine triggers are:
    • stress
    • skipping meals
    • too much caffeine
    • certain foods (alcohol, cheese, pizza, chocolate, ice cream, fatty or fried food, lunch meats, hot dogs, yogurt, aspartame, or anything with MSG, a seasoning often used in Asian foods)
    • sudden changes in sleep patterns
    • changes in hormone levels
    • smoking
    • weather changes
    • travel

  • Answer: Yes. In some people beetroot can trigger migraines, because they contain natural amounts of nitrates.This could be a sign of a food allergy. Go to a food allergist & get a blood test for food allergies. This is how I found out I was allergic to 20+ foods some of which were causing migraines.
  • Answer: No, not really... a head ache is pretty much when your head hurts. But a migrane is when your head hurts and everything around you seems brighter or louder than it really is.
  • Answer: No, an epidural will not help a Migraine attack. An epidural necessitates puncturing the area around the spinal cord which contains spinal fluid, and doing so may sometimes cause a cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leak that may result in headache.


    For appropriate diagnosis, treatment and prevention of headache disorders, seek the help of a board certified headache specialist.
  • Answer: 1. Migraine relief. link.
  • Answer: it is possible that stress can cause headaches.
  • Answer: ANSWER There is no one reason for having frequent migraines. There are many, many different things in the world that will trigger migraines. It all depends what your unique system reacts to.
    If you are having more than two migraines a month, you qualify for trying medication which may help reduce the frequency and severity of your migraine. To find one which works is a trial and error process, as there are many medications and there is no one medication that works in all cases.
    In some people, the longer their migraines go uncontrolled the more frequent they become, as the system becomes sensitized to being in that state. It becomes a vicious cycle that is hard to break, so the sooner you have them under control, the better.Below are some common migraine triggers to be aware of:
    1. Diet/Allergy: Many foods can trigger migraines. We hear about this all the time. Wines, aged cheeses, and chocolate being the most popular culprits. What is not often talked about is the role poor nutrition can play in causing migraines. Magnesium deficiency and a lack of the B vitamins are the most prominent. Maintaining a consistent eating pattern is also important, because dips in blood sugar or dips in your serotonin levels caused by lack of food can trigger a migraine.

    2. Environmental allergies: such as to mold.

    3. Smoking. Besides acting as an allergen and tripping you up that way, migraines may be caused in part by excess dopamine. Nicotine increases dopamine.

    4. Odors: Some migraineurs exhibit a sensitivity to perfumes or certain odors.

    5. Sunlight. Fluorescent light. Glare from computer screens. Sometimes it is the light itself, sometimes it is flickering - such as the almost imperceptible flicker of fluorescent lights, or a ceiling fan than is spinning over a light source.

    6. Stress, both directly and indirectly. Directly, because the physical changes brought on by stress (or by relaxations after long periods of stress) can cause migraines. Indirectly, because stress as a whole lowers your threshold for any other migraine trigger you might have. For example, perhaps you can normally stand 5 hours under fluorescent lights. Being stressed might lower that threshold down to 3 hours.

    7. Weather (barometric changes, cold, humidity, etc.. Different weather patterns affect people differently.)

    8. Extreme temperature shifts: such as staying in air conditioning all day and then walking outside into humid, summer weather. Or taking an incredibly hot shower and then running to catch the bus on a freezing day. You want to give your body time to adjust.

    9. Dehydration

    10. Patent Foramen Ovale - PFO is a congenital birth defect in which there is a small hole in the heart. Having surgery to correct this anomaly can help cut down on the frequency of your migraines.

    11. Lack of sleep OR too much sleep. (Maintaining a normal sleep schedule is key. This means not sleeping in until all hours on the weekends. You get up at the same time every day, you go to bed at the same time.)

    12. Hormonal changes (puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, perimenopause, menopause)

    13. Migraines from exertion. These can be brought on from exercise, or sometimes brought on by sex.

    14. Injury: Some people have migraines develop only after injuries, like a concussion, or neck trauma.

    15. Pseudotumor cerebri - where too much cerebrospinal fluid in the body is pressing on the brain. Sufferers are asked to maintain a healthy weight, and are often put on diuretics to help them urinate excess fluid from the body.


    16. Chiari Malformation - a condition where there is an abornormality in how the skull and brain has formed, causing too much cerebral spinal fluid to build up around the brain. Surgery is the preferred treatment.
    Other ANSWER seizures
  • Answer: Everything!!!! Light, sound, heat, cold, smell, emotion- their terrrible.
  • Answer: 3D movies may trigger a migraine if you find yourself straining your eyes.

    Solving eye strain during a 3D movie may be as simple as needing a decent pair of 3D glasses, or ones that fit over your normal glasses (if you wear them). You may need to make sure you are sitting towards the middle of the theater, so that the entirety of the screen is viewed through your lenses.
  • Answer:

    Some migraineurs have an allergy to dairy, whether it is a the casein proteins or the lactose, and this may trigger a migraine for them along with other bodily responses.

    Examining whether or not you have food sensitivities can be a good firm step to seeking out any food-based triggers you may have.
  • Answer: There are lots of medications safe while breastfeeding. Call your local lactation consultant and have her check the meds before taking them

How do you prevent migraines?

  • HOW TO PREVENT MIGRAINES
    Migraine headaches
    are triggered by changes in the levels of serotonin. There are many causes for migraines, and some people are more genetically inclined to have them. Migraines are more common in women and people over 50. Everyone has different migraine triggers.
    To prevent migraines, you need to learn what triggers them and reduce the them. The best method is to start a migraine diary, keeping track of the diet, sleeping patterns, medications, stress level, exercise routine, and supplements taken. Check your notes and look for patterns to discover the common triggers for your migraine. How often do the migraines occur? At what times of the day? How many times a week? How often in a month?

    Stress is usually a pretty big factor, so try to reduce the level of stress by meditating and exercising. You need to get enough rest, eat a healthy diet with fruits and vegetables. Decrease the amount of caffeine and alcohol, increase the foods with magnesium (cashew nuts, soybeans).
    Reduce exposure to intense stimuli- visual stimuli such as looking at computer and TV screens for a long time, bright lights; avoid extreme sensory stimuli such strong noises and smells.
    Keep track of the supplements and medications you take. Ask your doctor about the effects they might have on your migraine.

    Once you make some changes to your diet and lifestyle, check the new patterns and monitor improvement.
    If the migraines still persist and there is no improvement, consult your local headache specialist.

Add Comment & Answer


Name: *



Answers and Comments

  • Answer: HOW TO PREVENT MIGRAINES
    Migraine headaches
    are triggered by changes in the levels of serotonin. There are many causes for migraines, and some people are more genetically inclined to have them. Migraines are more common in women and people over 50. Everyone has different migraine triggers.
    To prevent migraines, you need to learn what triggers them and reduce the them. The best method is to start a migraine diary, keeping track of the diet, sleeping patterns, medications, stress level, exercise routine, and supplements taken. Check your notes and look for patterns to discover the common triggers for your migraine. How often do the migraines occur? At what times of the day? How many times a week? How often in a month?

    Stress is usually a pretty big factor, so try to reduce the level of stress by meditating and exercising. You need to get enough rest, eat a healthy diet with fruits and vegetables. Decrease the amount of caffeine and alcohol, increase the foods with magnesium (cashew nuts, soybeans).
    Reduce exposure to intense stimuli- visual stimuli such as looking at computer and TV screens for a long time, bright lights; avoid extreme sensory stimuli such strong noises and smells.
    Keep track of the supplements and medications you take. Ask your doctor about the effects they might have on your migraine.

    Once you make some changes to your diet and lifestyle, check the new patterns and monitor improvement.
    If the migraines still persist and there is no improvement, consult your local headache specialist.
  • Answer: Topamax and Neurotin are two of the most common medications used to prevent migraine headaches.
  • Answer: It is a side effect
    the others include:
    nausea, muscle aches, increased heart rate/ blood pressure
    and short-term memory loss (recover in 6 months)
  • Answer: if a child has a migraine then they should rest for 4 days and to make sure that they do not get it again you should not let them go back until it is gone completely. make sure that they are fine because stress may cause it to come back even worse than before.
  • Answer: Migraine is a genetic neurological disease. It is caused by your genetic makeup.
  • Answer: Migraine is a genetic neurological disease - the cause is your genetic makeup. Light however, is a frequent trigger for Migraine attacks.


    For appropriate diagnosis, treatment and prevention of headache disorders, seek the help of a board certified headache specialist.
  • Answer: Depends, if they are freqeunt then it may suggest other causes. By the same token though, if you do not normally suffer from them and have a sudden onset this may also suggest something else
  • Answer: Yes in fact guys do get migraines, see what happens is when the brain has a reaction to the nerve endings your brain goes into shock and you get a needle feeling and it does not matter if you are a guy or girl it is all the same in the end
  • Answer: You Doctor can prescribe specific medications that treat migraines. Also, my wife was given the painkiller Percocet, which helped alleviate the pain significantly. Codeine is another popular medicine for migraines. Finally, try praying to the patron Saint for migraines, St Gemma Galgani (died 1903).
  • Answer: Chronic daily migraine headache
  • Answer:

    Some people get migraines because it is genetic, a family trait. Some people are predisposed to having migraines because they have another illness. And some people just happen to have migraines - with no clear cut reason why their brain happens to have this particular dysfunction.

    Regardless of the why your brain is set up to get migraines, the fact is that there must be something in your life that sets the migraine cycle off.

    • Many foods can trigger migraines. Poor nutrition can cause it as well.
    • Environmental allergies - such as to mold.
    • Smoking
    • Odors: Some migraineurs exhibit a sensitivity to perfumes or certain odors.
    • Sunlight/fluorescent light/glare from computer screens
    • Stress, both directly and indirectly. Directly, because the physical changes brought on by stress (or by relaxations after long periods of stress) can cause migraines. Indirectly, because stress as a whole lowers your threshold for any other migraine trigger you might have. For example, perhaps you can normally stand 5 hours under fluorescent lights. Being stressed might lower that threshold down to 3 hours.
    • Weather (barometric changes)
    • Extreme temperature shifts
    • Dehydration
    • PFO - Patent Foramen Ovale is a congenital birth defect in which there is a small hole in the heart. Having surgery to correct this anomaly can help cut down on the frequency of your migraines.
    • Lack of sleep OR Too much sleep. (maintaining a normal sleep schedule is key)
    • Hormonal changes (puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, perimenopause, menopause)
    • Migraines from exertion. These can be brought on from exercise, or sometimes brought on by sex.
    • Some people have migraines develop only after injuries, like a concussion, or neck trauma.
    • Pseudotumor cerebri - where too much cerebrospinal fluid in the body is pressing on the brain.

    Learning to manage these triggers can go a long way to reducing the frequency and severity of your migraine attacks.
  • Answer: Too much stress can cause migraine thus increasing hydrochloric acid causing ulcer in the stomach.
  • Answer: Frequent migraines by themselves cannot cause death, but they can stop a person from living their life in any meaningful way by incapacitating them.

    However, it should be noted that in extremely rare cases people who suffer from migraine with aura end up having a stroke. Again - this is a rare occurrence.
  • Answer: cuz studying hurts, but Study either way ;)
  • Answer: Yes - Migraines are a genetic neurologic disease. The cause is genetic, however dehydration can trigger a Migraine attack in someone who is susceptible to Migraines.