Similar Questions

  • Answer: Alcoholism can have any of a number of negative effects on family life, finances, employment, traffic safety, and health.
  • Answer: Yes, there is. Most of it involves time and thinking, and some moral support from others. All I know are the steps in the Big Book. Are there any additional methods?
  • Answer: We do not know. Alcoholism has been with humans since beer was invented several thousand years ago.
  • Answer: What do you mean where does alcoholism occur? Do you mean where in the body does the problem occur or where in a geographical location?

    If you want to know more about the reasons why people are alcoholics you might want to read some support forums or websites with articles that would give you more insight to the disease / addiction that will allow you to come up with your own answer.

    Geographically alcoholism occurs anywhere there is alcohol. It is just like any other substance that people choose to abuse. Eventually they develop a physical or emotional need for that substance and become addicted.

    Check out some of these sites for more info:

    http://www.alcoholtreatmentclinics.com - alcohol treatment program info
    http://alcoholism.about.com/
  • Answer: To completely stay sober and never drink again. Stay busy and avoid triggers. Meet new people. Realize what you have to lose.
  • Answer: Alchoholism is a major problem in the world. It affects up to 1 in 10 drinkers. It carries enormous costs to society in terms of health, crime , violence, absenteeism, etc. Most people have to deal with an alcoholic friend or relative at some point in their lives, and are usually impacted in other ways, such as random acts of violence or drunk drivers. The more people studying this disease, the better. The 90% of the population who are non-alchoholics have a lot to contribute to combatting the problem by studying it, and working in specialized areas - It reaches into every corner of society. Arguably, the only people who understand the true nature of alcoholism are those who have experienced it first hand,and they are the most effective at councilling alcoholics, and helping them get sober.
  • Answer: There is, had has been, much controversy about the validity of the disease theory (or hypothesis) of alcoholism. A substantial proportion of physicians reject the disease concept of alcoholism.
  • Answer: Yes, alcoholism is really a bad thing because it destroys your immune system.
    also it affect relationship with your family members & with your good friends.
    So, If you want to be happy then avoid alcoholism.
    & tell people, friends around you to stop it.
  • Answer: In a short answer - yes it can be treated. Usually with treatment that includes a self help program (AA) and therapy to learn not to drink and ways of dealing without drinking.
  • Answer: Yes, your mothers liver is a huge impact on yours.
  • Answer: Alcoholism is a progressive addiction meaning the desire to drink and the effects of drinking get worse over time. Alcohol effects each individual slightly differently.
    <a href="http://www.addictioninsite.com" target="_new">alcohol rehab</a>
  • Answer: Alcoholism can be conceptualized as a sin, a bad habit, a disease, an addiction, or as any of a number of other things.
  • Answer: No. Alcoholism is a life-long battle that can be fought with 12 step programs. There is no way to drink and control alcoholism.

How do you prevent alcoholism?

  • One way to never display alcoholic symptoms is to never drink.
    I believe Alcoholism is considered by the American Medical Association to be a chronic disease, like diabetes. Check their web page to see what they say about alcoholism.


    People I know who have recovered using the Alcoholics Anonymous recovery program tell me that alcoholism to a three part disease; a) physical, b) mental/emotional, and c) spiritual.
    Apparently, when an alcoholic drinks alcohol, it triggers an involuntary allergic reaction. For alcoholics, the reaction is an irresistible physical craving to drink more alcohol. That is why they keep on drinking beyond normal amounts of alcohol.


    For more about this, you can read the book "Alcoholics Anonymous".


    My recovered alcoholic friends tell me that if someone has to count how many drinks they are having (trying to prevent getting drunk, again) , has ever passed out, blacked out, driven drunk, repeatedly drank more than they wanted to, or has a distinct personality change when they drink then they might already be, or may be becoming an alcoholic.


    On the other hand, the Jude Thaddeus Program (soberforever.net) appears to be the most effective approach to alcohol dependence and alcoholism in the world. It is a research project operated by the Baldwin Research Institute, a New York State not-for-profit organization owned by taxpayers.


    Independently-conducted research has established an overall success rate of 63.5% for the Jude Thaddeus Program. This compares to a success rate in the range of 0-20% for conventional programs. Alcoholics Anonymous(AA) reports a success rate lower than 5%. Research also indicates that no treatment at all has a success rate of about 30%. This suggests that traditional programs are less effective than doing nothing.

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  • Answer: One way to never display alcoholic symptoms is to never drink.
    I believe Alcoholism is considered by the American Medical Association to be a chronic disease, like diabetes. Check their web page to see what they say about alcoholism.


    People I know who have recovered using the Alcoholics Anonymous recovery program tell me that alcoholism to a three part disease; a) physical, b) mental/emotional, and c) spiritual.
    Apparently, when an alcoholic drinks alcohol, it triggers an involuntary allergic reaction. For alcoholics, the reaction is an irresistible physical craving to drink more alcohol. That is why they keep on drinking beyond normal amounts of alcohol.


    For more about this, you can read the book "Alcoholics Anonymous".


    My recovered alcoholic friends tell me that if someone has to count how many drinks they are having (trying to prevent getting drunk, again) , has ever passed out, blacked out, driven drunk, repeatedly drank more than they wanted to, or has a distinct personality change when they drink then they might already be, or may be becoming an alcoholic.


    On the other hand, the Jude Thaddeus Program (soberforever.net) appears to be the most effective approach to alcohol dependence and alcoholism in the world. It is a research project operated by the Baldwin Research Institute, a New York State not-for-profit organization owned by taxpayers.


    Independently-conducted research has established an overall success rate of 63.5% for the Jude Thaddeus Program. This compares to a success rate in the range of 0-20% for conventional programs. Alcoholics Anonymous(AA) reports a success rate lower than 5%. Research also indicates that no treatment at all has a success rate of about 30%. This suggests that traditional programs are less effective than doing nothing.
  • Answer: Either cut back or abstain at the first signs of possible problem drinking.
  • Answer: Alcoholism is influenced by genetic, psychological, social andenvironmental factors that have an impact on how it affects yourbody and behavior. The process of becoming addicted to alcoholoccurs gradually, although some people have an abnormal response toalcohol from the time they start drinking.
  • Answer: YES you can, well if you drink like a lot..if u never drink then uhmm no.~samantha~
  • Answer: When we started drinking alcohol our brain will make it as a habit and we. Cannot leave it because it will be very irritating to us
  • Answer: .Alcoholism is a disease that is caused by a person drinking toomuch alcohol and it disrupts his life. It can cause poverty,destroy families, and the physical health of a person.
  • Answer: alcoholics
  • Answer: i know for a fact that it causes drunkness which causes drunk driving and sometimes even severe health problems
  • Answer: maybe alcoholer.haha
  • Answer: There is great debate concerning what causes alcoholism. There is even debate about how to define alcoholism and whether or not it is a disease.

    A craving for much alcohol each and every day may be a symptom, but is not necessarily so.
  • Answer: Has Gone Up? Not sure what you mean. Up in costs? Alcoholism is a disease that is destroying our country and their are wonderful resources out there for those struggling with this killer.
  • Answer: Alcoholism is thought to be a combination of genetic and behavioral factors. It appears that some people have a genetic predisposition to alcohol addiction, and that if they drink enough (sometimes for quite short periods) they will become alcohol dependent.

    The behavioral factors dominate, however. For example, a person with a genetic predisposition will obviously not become an alcoholic if she never takes a drink. On the other hand, just about anyone will become addicted to alcohol -- just like any other drug -- if he drinks heavily for a long enough period.

    A third factor is the question of why we pursue the alcohol high to start with. Social drinkers have different motivating factors than, say, someone who drinks to help suppress the effects of emotional trauma, or who self-medicates a neurochemical problem. Thus, we say that what matters is not how much we drink, but why we drink, and the effect that the drinking has on our lives.
    Alot of it depends on your past. Alot of people think that alcohol is the answer to having a rough life or losing the one you love. Therefore, the longer the pain is there, the more alcohol they will drink to get it off their mind. Or, other times, some people just love drinkin it because. But i believe alot of it has to with past and present.
    GET DRUNK, DUMBO! hahaha
  • Answer: confusion in mind
    some idiots thinking ,it can build there body
  • Answer: i think it is wrong, and it can break up a family.
  • Answer: Stop consuming alcohol and never consume alcohol again. You may need a support group like AA.